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Doc on Jon Husband

<![CDATA[The Doc Searls Weblog : Wednesday, February 9, 2005: First, I don’t write this blog for anybody but myself and my readers. By that I mean, it’s not a “medium” for advertisers, or anybody other than my first person singular self. There’s not only nothing between you and me; there’s nothing behind me, either. There’s […]

<![CDATA[The Doc Searls Weblog : Wednesday, February 9, 2005:

First, I don’t write this blog for anybody but myself and my readers. By that I mean, it’s not a “medium” for advertisers, or anybody other than my first person singular self. There’s not only nothing between you and me; there’s nothing behind me, either. There’s you and me, not you and somebody behind me (which would make me a medium, no?). Certainly not economically. John makes this distinction clear to me when he writes people are finding out ways of building up trust and credibility whilst carrying on or out some kinds of exchange of value. If I’m building up trust and credibility here, it’s most definitley not so I can cash in on it, or “exchange value” for it. This isn’t to say that I’m not in the marketplace, by the way. It’s to say I’m not selling anything here. That rotting blogroll over there on the right (gotta clean that up one of these days) isn’t about an “exchange” of anything. It’s about two other forces that also play in every marketplace: conversation and relationship. “Monetizing” those forces is a good thing in most cases. We wouldn’t have markets without it. But not in all cases. This here is one of them.

I think the disconnect between an explicit monetary exchange and the exchange of social capital is rather thin. Doc makes a lot on the credibility of his blog, but he does it outside the context of his blog. That, however, is not a system that scales in all circumstances, especially if the blogger’s main living doesn’t come from writing books, speaking and writing for fees. And, for the blogger hoping to turn their credibility into a living, the blog remains the focal point of their effort, so how do you monetize that without associating it with some economic engine, whether it’s advertising (my blog, Weblogs Inc. or Chris Pirillo, for example) or employment (Scoble)?
There are many paths in the middle way. What Doc has always—and rightly—warned against is careening to the extremes of marketing that characterized the old way of talking down to people rather than conversing. But that’s not what Jon is talking about.]]>