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Missing the radio competition

<![CDATA[Fast Company | Written in the Stars: The face-off between XM and Sirius might well be unprecedented in modern business history. In most industries, the competitive landscape is populated by many rivals. But satellite radio is truly a rarity — a duopoly of combatants slugging it out for potentially huge gains. Eight years ago, when […]

<![CDATA[Fast Company | Written in the Stars:

The face-off between XM and Sirius might well be unprecedented in modern business history. In most industries, the competitive landscape is populated by many rivals. But satellite radio is truly a rarity — a duopoly of combatants slugging it out for potentially huge gains. Eight years ago, when the Federal Communications Commission awarded two licenses for satellite spectrum at a price tag of $90 million each to American Mobile Radio (now XM) and CD Radio (now Sirius), it created a perfect laboratory setting in which to observe raw, one-on-one competition.

The story of satellite radio is totally mischaracterized here. Satellite radio is just one of many non-traditional channels for listening. Podcasting, Audible (Discosure: I work with Audible.), TiVo (and the things like it that survive), Akimbo, Neuros… everything is moving toward self-programmed listening. The competitive landscape isn’t just radio, it’s anywhere a device can take a feed of almost any sort.]]>